Show Notes

In today’s episode, we have Glen Albaugh. Glen is a teacher, a coach, a philosopher, and a doctor. He’s known for creating a unique applied sport psychology consulting services for a range of professional and amateur golfers alike. In his early years, he taught psychology at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California as well as coached the Pacific Tigers golf team. During this time, he gained knowledge on how athletes should train their minds while playing, and that’s when he wrote his book Winning the Battle Within. He prides himself of working with a lot of professional golfers and college golf coaches.

Meaning of the word ‘Battle’ in his book Winning the Battle Within [0:50]

  • You have to read the book and find out how he can help you win it.
  • It’s very individualized e.g., can you help me perform? Can you help me deal with the competition in a sport?

Some of the core principles brought to light in the book [2:07]

  • First principle is finding what the battle is and he’ll help you with that. [2:23]
  • For example, if you want to improve your golf performance, first thing is accessing where you are emotionally, accessing what your practice regimens are, accessing your motivation, and your purpose regarding your performance.
  • He’ll then give you a questionnaire. What is it like when you play your best? What are things you say to yourself when you’re at your best? Where do you focus when playing your best? What are you like when you play your worst?
  • Second principle is content. We divide the brain into 3 minds; conscious mind, emotional mind, and the athletic mind. The athletic mind is the one that sees, feels, hears, and it works a thousand times faster.
  • It’s very important for us to balance our minds in training and performing. [6:14]

Joe Montana and his 6th sense on the football field [11:09]

  • One day I asked Joe Montana, ‘’When you pass play and when you come up at the center, what do you see, what do you do?’’ he said, ‘’I see all five receivers in my imagination running around and I see the pass going to three. So what do you think of that?’’ I said, ‘’I don’t care if you keep doing that.’’
  • As a golfer, the visualization is one of the important senses we have. We teach people to visualize, to see shots.
  • There was no compromise with Joe.

Do you think Joe Montana has an intrinsic gift? [15:23]

  • ‘’I don’t think I’m going to buy the gift thing.’’
  • As we watch Joe Montana, all we see is the finished product. We don’t see everything that he had to do in order to get to that point.
  • We use the word gifted instead of saying this person prepared or this person practiced. [16:35]
  • Joe Montana has taken me places I never dreamt of going because of his ability to utilize all of his senses.

When you reach the pinnacle of that sweet spot in the golf shot, it’s a metaphor for all of life in our pursuit [19:25]

  • To be open to the possibility of extraordinary experiences, you’ve got to do all the stuff in the pyramid method.
  • We always teach golfers that the swing is never going to be the same, but the execution of the swing will be the same. [21:08]

Michael Murphy, the author of Golf in The Kingdom, changed your life? [25:11]

  • Michael and I were childhood friends. We started a golf game in 1947 after we got cuffed on a baseball team.
  • In 1973, I read the book and we reconnected and it changed my life forever.
  • It put me in a direction of teaching people, coaching people, and everything I know about golfing from the inside.
  • The book was centered on how we can play with this wonderful century system known as the athletic mind. We can beat it and we have to know it and allow it to surface, allow it nurture, and allow it to grow.
  • ‘’We have a series of 8 to 9 drills that are all centered around developing the inner game and internal feedback system.’’ [30:57]

How the athletic mind differs from the mind awareness that we have in other ventures in our lives [33:45]

  • For the athletic mind, specificity is very important. What do you see? How do you see it? How often do you see it? What color is it? This helps to build up a routine to play.
  • Words like focus, confidence, and zone are too general.

     What about your relationship with Bill Walsh and how you shared your coaching wisdom? [36:23]

  • ’Bill Walsh was a genius. He’s a genius in the way he had relationships with his players.’’
  • Bill had a cunning ability to challenge and support in one swoop.
  • When I was with him, I knew I was his best friend, but I also knew he had other best friends. That’s the way you would feel when you were with him.
  • He was really good at coaching and he made sure his assistants followed processes. He never talked about winning, he talked about playing.
  • Bill and I went to the Soviet Union and found out how far ahead they were in training their coaches versus the United States. We were amazed.

Soviet Union’s extraordinary training back in the 80’s. [44:08]

  • Soviet Union organized coaching as a science and an art. [44:17] They had different courses for all aspects we discussed earlier.
  • The coaches were highly trained and the athletes highly motivated.

If we demystify our cultural and ideological differences, we can begin to build bridges as a culture and people with Russia. [47:54]

  • ‘’Absolutely. We have track 2 diplomacy, the Russian-American institute where my wife runs it. We bring people together in both countries to see what we can do to save humanity.’’

What does Omni athlete mean to you? [48:49]

  • It’s a treasure for the things that we share and learn together.

PULLED QUOTES

  • First principle is finding what the battle is and he’ll help you with that. [2:23]
  • It’s very important for us to balance our minds in training and performing. [6:14]
  • We use the word gifted instead of saying this person prepared or this person practiced. [16:35]
  • We always teach golfers that the swing is not going to be the same, but the execution of the swing will be the same. [21:08]
  • ‘’We have a series of 8 to 9 drills that are all centered around developing the inner game and internal feedback system.’’ [30:57]
  • Soviet Union organized coaching as a science and an art. [44:17]